Word Recognition Functions for the CID W-22 Test in Multitalker Noise for Normally Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Subjects Word recognition functions for Auditee recordings of the CID W-22 stimuli in multitalker noise were obtained using subjects with normal hearing and with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss. In the first experiment, word recognition functions were generated by varying the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N); whereas in the second experiment, a constant S/N ... Reports
Reports  |   February 01, 1989
Word Recognition Functions for the CID W-22 Test in Multitalker Noise for Normally Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Subjects
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   February 01, 1989
Word Recognition Functions for the CID W-22 Test in Multitalker Noise for Normally Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Subjects
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1989, Vol. 54, 20-32. doi:10.1044/jshd.5401.20
History: Received June 1, 1987 , Accepted December 9, 1987
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1989, Vol. 54, 20-32. doi:10.1044/jshd.5401.20
History: Received June 1, 1987; Accepted December 9, 1987

Word recognition functions for Auditee recordings of the CID W-22 stimuli in multitalker noise were obtained using subjects with normal hearing and with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss. In the first experiment, word recognition functions were generated by varying the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N); whereas in the second experiment, a constant S/N was used and stimulus intensity was varied. The split-half reliability of word recognition scores for the normal-hearing and hearing-impaired groups revealed variability that agreed closely with predictions based on the simple binomial distribution. Therefore, the binomial model appears appropriate for estimating the variability of word recognition scores whether they are obtained in quiet or in a competing background noise. The reliability for threshold (50% point) revealed good stability. The slope of the recognition function was steeper for normal listeners than for the hearing-impaired subjects. Word recognition testing in noise can provide insight into the problems imposed by hearing loss, particularly when evaluating patients with mild hearing loss who exhibit no difficulties with conventional tests. Clinicians should employ a sufficient number of stimuli so that the test is adequately sensitive to differences among listening conditions.

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