Effects of Auditory Feedback and Phonetic Context on Stomal Noise in Laryngectomized Speakers Stomal noise intensity during esophageal speech was measured in 7 laryngectomized subjects during amplified monaural auditory feedback and during control conditions without feedback. A significant (5–10 dB) reduction in stomal noise was observed when auditory feedback was applied. The conditions without feedback were designed to provide additional information regarding the ... Reports
Reports  |   August 01, 1987
Effects of Auditory Feedback and Phonetic Context on Stomal Noise in Laryngectomized Speakers
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   August 01, 1987
Effects of Auditory Feedback and Phonetic Context on Stomal Noise in Laryngectomized Speakers
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1987, Vol. 52, 243-250. doi:10.1044/jshd.5203.243
History: Received August 19, 1986 , Accepted December 15, 1986
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1987, Vol. 52, 243-250. doi:10.1044/jshd.5203.243
History: Received August 19, 1986; Accepted December 15, 1986

Stomal noise intensity during esophageal speech was measured in 7 laryngectomized subjects during amplified monaural auditory feedback and during control conditions without feedback. A significant (5–10 dB) reduction in stomal noise was observed when auditory feedback was applied. The conditions without feedback were designed to provide additional information regarding the effects of the initial phonetic element in the esophageal speech token on stomal noise. During the control conditions, esophageal speech tokens beginning with voiceless consonants resulted in significantly more stomal noise than was present for the other speech tokens. Clinical implications of the findings are discussed.

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