Fast Mapping in Normal and Language-Impaired Children In this study, the fast mapping skills of a group of 11 normal children (ages 4:0–5:6) were compared to those of a group of 11 language-impaired children (ages 4:1–5:4) exhibiting expressive syntactic deficits. Fast mapping is a hypothesized process enabling children to create lexical representations for new words after as ... Reports
Reports  |   August 01, 1987
Fast Mapping in Normal and Language-Impaired Children
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   August 01, 1987
Fast Mapping in Normal and Language-Impaired Children
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1987, Vol. 52, 218-222. doi:10.1044/jshd.5203.218
History: Received August 22, 1986 , Accepted October 30, 1986
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1987, Vol. 52, 218-222. doi:10.1044/jshd.5203.218
History: Received August 22, 1986; Accepted October 30, 1986

In this study, the fast mapping skills of a group of 11 normal children (ages 4:0–5:6) were compared to those of a group of 11 language-impaired children (ages 4:1–5:4) exhibiting expressive syntactic deficits. Fast mapping is a hypothesized process enabling children to create lexical representations for new words after as little as a single exposure. Subjects encountered a nonsense word and its novel object referent. Subsequent tasks probed the amount and kinds of information about the new word that the subjects had entered into memory. Normal and language-impaired subjects did not differ in their ability to infer a connection between the novel word and referent, to comprehend the novel word after a single exposure, and to recall some nonlinguistic information associated with the referent. However, the language-impaired subjects were less successful than the normal subjects in producing the new word, recalling significantly fewer of its three phonemes.

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