Alaryngeal Speech Intelligibility and the Older Listener Past investigations of alaryngeal speech intelligibility have focused on comparative intelligibility as perceived by young normally hearing adults. However, the spouses and social companions of laryngectomees may have significantly different auditory capabilities compared to young listeners. This report presents a comparison of alaryngeal and laryngeal speech identification performance for a ... Reports
Reports  |   February 01, 1985
Alaryngeal Speech Intelligibility and the Older Listener
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   February 01, 1985
Alaryngeal Speech Intelligibility and the Older Listener
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1985, Vol. 50, 60-65. doi:10.1044/jshd.5001.60
History: Received March 31, 1983 , Accepted November 1, 1984
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1985, Vol. 50, 60-65. doi:10.1044/jshd.5001.60
History: Received March 31, 1983; Accepted November 1, 1984

Past investigations of alaryngeal speech intelligibility have focused on comparative intelligibility as perceived by young normally hearing adults. However, the spouses and social companions of laryngectomees may have significantly different auditory capabilities compared to young listeners. This report presents a comparison of alaryngeal and laryngeal speech identification performance for a group of young normally hearing listeners and a group of older adult listeners representative of the age of the laryngectomee's social companions. The speech signals investigated included normal laryngeal speech, artificial larynx speech, traditional esophageal speech, and tracheoesophageal speech. The results obtained reveal not only differences in speech signals but also a difference in the proficiency of speech perception for the two groups, favoring the younger listeners. The results of the speech identification measures in the presence of auditory competition revealed greatest intelligibility for the artificial larynx speech signal and poorest for the tracheoesophageal speech signal.

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