Rule Invention in the Acquisition of Morphology by a Language-Impaired Child This paper presents a case study of a language-impaired child who invented a unique morphophonologic rule for signaling the distinction between English singular and plural nouns. Conventional linguistic-phonetic analysis indicated that the child was producing the distinction suprasegmentally rather than segmentally. Acoustic-phonetic analysis of matched singular-plural noun pairs was performed ... Reports
Reports  |   February 01, 1985
Rule Invention in the Acquisition of Morphology by a Language-Impaired Child
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   February 01, 1985
Rule Invention in the Acquisition of Morphology by a Language-Impaired Child
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1985, Vol. 50, 40-45. doi:10.1044/jshd.5001.40
History: Received April 29, 1983 , Accepted October 7, 1984
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1985, Vol. 50, 40-45. doi:10.1044/jshd.5001.40
History: Received April 29, 1983; Accepted October 7, 1984

This paper presents a case study of a language-impaired child who invented a unique morphophonologic rule for signaling the distinction between English singular and plural nouns. Conventional linguistic-phonetic analysis indicated that the child was producing the distinction suprasegmentally rather than segmentally. Acoustic-phonetic analysis of matched singular-plural noun pairs was performed in order to determine quantitatively which suprasegmental acoustic cues he used to signal the distinction. Results of a multivariate analysis of variance revealed that singular and plural productions were significantly different from one another on various fundamental frequency, duration, and intensity parameters. This example of a child's linguistic creativity is offered as further evidence in support of a model of language acquisition that emphasizes the cognitive aspects underlying linguistic regularities in child language. Clinical implications are also discussed.

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