Facilitating Word Combination in Language-Impaired Children through Discourse Structure The influence of an adult-child discourse structure on the production of early word combinations was examined in language-impaired children. The subjects were 10 children (2:8–3:4) at the single-word utterance level. Eight of the children were engaged in 10 experimental sessions utilizing vertical structures (e.g., Adult: "Who's this?" Child: "Daddy." Adult: ... Reports
Reports  |   February 01, 1985
Facilitating Word Combination in Language-Impaired Children through Discourse Structure
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   February 01, 1985
Facilitating Word Combination in Language-Impaired Children through Discourse Structure
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1985, Vol. 50, 31-39. doi:10.1044/jshd.5001.31
History: Received June 14, 1983 , Accepted September 19, 1984
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1985, Vol. 50, 31-39. doi:10.1044/jshd.5001.31
History: Received June 14, 1983; Accepted September 19, 1984

The influence of an adult-child discourse structure on the production of early word combinations was examined in language-impaired children. The subjects were 10 children (2:8–3:4) at the single-word utterance level. Eight of the children were engaged in 10 experimental sessions utilizing vertical structures (e.g., Adult: "Who's this?" Child: "Daddy." Adult: "What's Daddy throwing?" Child: "Ball." Adult: "Yeah, Daddy's throwing the ball."), while the remaining children, serving as controls, were engaged in an alternate activity. Examination of pretest and posttest data as well as session data revealed a substantial increase in the number of multiword productions for most of the children in the experimental group but not for the children serving as controls. These findings indicate that vertical structures have a facilitating effect on the multiword productions of language-impaired children comparable to that found in an identical procedure with normally developing children. The use of a naturally occurring adult-child discourse structure as an intervention procedure is discussed.

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