Proportional and Functional Analogical Reasoning in Normal and Language-Impaired Children Teachers often use analogies in classroom settings to clarify new concepts for their students. However, analogies may inadvertently confuse the youngster who has difficulty identifying the one-to-one comparisons underlying them. Although analogical reasoning has been studied extensively in normal children, no information was available concerning this construct in children having ... Reports
Reports  |   November 01, 1988
Proportional and Functional Analogical Reasoning in Normal and Language-Impaired Children
 
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Reports   |   November 01, 1988
Proportional and Functional Analogical Reasoning in Normal and Language-Impaired Children
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1988, Vol. 53, 440-448. doi:10.1044/jshd.5304.440
History: Received June 8, 1987 , Accepted November 24, 1987
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1988, Vol. 53, 440-448. doi:10.1044/jshd.5304.440
History: Received June 8, 1987; Accepted November 24, 1987

Teachers often use analogies in classroom settings to clarify new concepts for their students. However, analogies may inadvertently confuse the youngster who has difficulty identifying the one-to-one comparisons underlying them. Although analogical reasoning has been studied extensively in normal children, no information was available concerning this construct in children having a specific language impairment. Thus, it was unknown to what extent they might be deficient in analogical reasoning. Therefore, in the present study, 20 children ages 6--8 years (mean age = 7:6) having normal nonverbal intelligence but deficits in language comprehension were administered tasks of verbal and perceptual proportional analogical reasoning and a problem-solving task of functional analogical reasoning. Compared to a normal-language control group matched on the basis of chronological age and sex, the language-impaired group was deficient in all three tasks of analogical reasoning. However, when the factor of nonverbal intelligence was controlled statistically, the differences between the groups on each of the tasks were removed. Additional findings were that verbal proportional analogical reasoning was significantly correlated to perceptual proportional analogical reasoning and to functional analogical reasoning. Implications for assessment and intervention with young school-age language-impaired children are discussed.

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