Within-Clinic versus Outside-of-Clinic Self-Monitoring of Articulation to Promote Generalization The purpose of this study was to assess the generalization of correct articulation to nontreatment environments when self-monitoring procedures were implemented within versus outside of the clinic setting. Seven children who substituted δ/and /ð/ for /s/ and /z/ participated in this study. Data were collected in the context of a ... Reports
Reports  |   November 01, 1988
Within-Clinic versus Outside-of-Clinic Self-Monitoring of Articulation to Promote Generalization
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   November 01, 1988
Within-Clinic versus Outside-of-Clinic Self-Monitoring of Articulation to Promote Generalization
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1988, Vol. 53, 392-399. doi:10.1044/jshd.5304.392
History: Received August 24, 1987 , Accepted October 28, 1987
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1988, Vol. 53, 392-399. doi:10.1044/jshd.5304.392
History: Received August 24, 1987; Accepted October 28, 1987

The purpose of this study was to assess the generalization of correct articulation to nontreatment environments when self-monitoring procedures were implemented within versus outside of the clinic setting. Seven children who substituted δ/and /ð/ for /s/ and /z/ participated in this study. Data were collected in the context of a multiple baseline design replicated across subjects. The children initially self-monitored their correct articulation during conversation in the clinic setting where treatment was implemented. Then, after varying intervals, self-monitoring outside of the clinic setting was introduced as well. The results showed that when the children monitored their speech within the clinic setting only, no generalization of correct target sound production outside of the clinic setting occurred. However, after the children were required to monitor their speech outside of the clinic setting, rapid and widespread generalization was measured. These results are discussed in relation to practical and theoretieal implications. Additional data collected on number of responses, the accuracy of the children's monitoring, and the percentage of correct responses are also discussed.

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