Perception and Production of the Final /s-ts/ Contrast in Dutch by Misarticulating Children This Study investigates the specific relationship between speech perception and speech production by comparing 6- and 7-year-old children who misarticulated the final consonant cluster/-ts/ with three control groups. One control group of children misarticulated other phonemes than the specific/-ts/ cluster, another group of children had no articulation problems at all, ... Reports
Reports  |   August 01, 1988
Perception and Production of the Final /s-ts/ Contrast in Dutch by Misarticulating Children
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   August 01, 1988
Perception and Production of the Final /s-ts/ Contrast in Dutch by Misarticulating Children
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1988, Vol. 53, 262-270. doi:10.1044/jshd.5303.262
History: Received May 13, 1987 , Accepted September 22, 1987
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1988, Vol. 53, 262-270. doi:10.1044/jshd.5303.262
History: Received May 13, 1987; Accepted September 22, 1987

This Study investigates the specific relationship between speech perception and speech production by comparing 6- and 7-year-old children who misarticulated the final consonant cluster/-ts/ with three control groups. One control group of children misarticulated other phonemes than the specific/-ts/ cluster, another group of children had no articulation problems at all, and a third control group consisted of normally articulating adults. Perception was studied by assessing identification functions on a /mœs/-to-/mœts/ speech continuum in which the silence period had been manipulated. Production was analyzed by measuring the silence periods in productions of the Dutch word muts. The results show a clear hierarchical trend: The poorer the articulation proficiency of a group, the more variability there is in both production and perception. In perception, this variability is not restricted to the problematic /-ts/ cluster but includes the whole /-s/-to-/-ts/ contrast. Furthermore, it appears that a general as well as a specific relationship exists between perception and production and that the character of this relationship does not support the motor theory of speech perception.

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