Conversational Interactions between Mothers and Learning-Disabled or Nondisabled Children during a Problem-Solving Task This study focused on mother-child interactions during a problem-solving task to determine whether (a) mothers of learning-disabled children engage in conversational buffering to facilitate their child's participation in the task, and (b) whether learning-disabled children differ from nondisabled children in their use of language with their mothers. The results of ... Reports
Reports  |   February 01, 1984
Conversational Interactions between Mothers and Learning-Disabled or Nondisabled Children during a Problem-Solving Task
 
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Reports   |   February 01, 1984
Conversational Interactions between Mothers and Learning-Disabled or Nondisabled Children during a Problem-Solving Task
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1984, Vol. 49, 64-71. doi:10.1044/jshd.4901.64
History: Received June 7, 1982 , Accepted July 19, 1983
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1984, Vol. 49, 64-71. doi:10.1044/jshd.4901.64
History: Received June 7, 1982; Accepted July 19, 1983

This study focused on mother-child interactions during a problem-solving task to determine whether (a) mothers of learning-disabled children engage in conversational buffering to facilitate their child's participation in the task, and (b) whether learning-disabled children differ from nondisabled children in their use of language with their mothers. The results of this study provide some evidence that mothers of both learning-disabled and nondisabled children engage in conversational buffering, although there were few differences between the mothers of the learning-disabled and nondisabled children. Differences between learning-disabled and nondisabled children showed that the learning-disabled were more likely to agree with and less likely to disagree with their mothers than were the nondisabled children. These findings provide some evidence of maternal conversational buffering and suggest that learning-disabled children's previously reported unassertive conversational style in peer interactions extends to talk with their mothers.

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