Audiometric Correlates of the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly The self-assessment of hearing handicap has received considerable attention in recent years. The Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE) is a self-assessment technique designed to quantify the emotional and social effects of self-perceived hearing impairment in the noninstitutionalized elderly. The purpose of the present study was to examine the ... Reports
Reports  |   November 01, 1983
Audiometric Correlates of the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   November 01, 1983
Audiometric Correlates of the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1983, Vol. 48, 379-384. doi:10.1044/jshd.4804.379
History: Received June 11, 1982 , Accepted June 13, 1983
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1983, Vol. 48, 379-384. doi:10.1044/jshd.4804.379
History: Received June 11, 1982; Accepted June 13, 1983

The self-assessment of hearing handicap has received considerable attention in recent years. The Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE) is a self-assessment technique designed to quantify the emotional and social effects of self-perceived hearing impairment in the noninstitutionalized elderly. The purpose of the present study was to examine the audiometric correlates of hearing handicap as measured by the HHIE. One hundred elderly subjects received complete audiometric evaluations as well as the HHIE. The results indicated that pure-tone sensitivity in the better ear was most highly correlated with the HHIE (r = .61) and that word recognition accounted for no more than 20% of the variance in HHIE scores. These results are similar to those reported for younger subjects and for other handicap assessment techniques. The results also indicated that there is considerable individual variability in the emotional and social response to hearing impairment, especially in individuals with mild (26–40 dB PTA in better ear) hearing impairment. The variability in response to impairment coupled with the fact that audiometric measures explain less than 50% of the variance in hearing handicap suggest that hearing handicap in the elderly will be measured more appropriate via a self-report format rather than as an inference from audiometric data.

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