An Analysis of Commitments Made by Student Clinicians in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology This study identified and classified commitments made by student clinicians in speech-language pathology and audiology supervisory conferences and provides a methodology for documenting change in supervisees' behavior as a result of supervisory interaction. Five different types of commitments were isolated and served as the basis of the Commitment Classification System. ... Reports
Reports  |   May 01, 1988
An Analysis of Commitments Made by Student Clinicians in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   May 01, 1988
An Analysis of Commitments Made by Student Clinicians in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1988, Vol. 53, 202-210. doi:10.1044/jshd.5302.202
History: Received June 22, 1987 , Accepted September 4, 1987
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1988, Vol. 53, 202-210. doi:10.1044/jshd.5302.202
History: Received June 22, 1987; Accepted September 4, 1987

This study identified and classified commitments made by student clinicians in speech-language pathology and audiology supervisory conferences and provides a methodology for documenting change in supervisees' behavior as a result of supervisory interaction. Five different types of commitments were isolated and served as the basis of the Commitment Classification System. They included clinical procedures, clinical process administration, supervisory procedures, supervisory process administration, and academic information/teaching function. The independent variables were condition (written agreement or no written agreement between supervisee and supervisor), order of conditions, experience level of supervisee, week number within each condition, and type of commitments. Frequency data were collected for 6 consecutive weeks. The resulting 1,389 commitments made by 64 student clinicians in 384 individual conferences at 12 universities were analyzed within a multiple analysis of variance. Significant findings (p < .05) indicated that the greatest number of commitments made involved planning, analysis, and evaluation of the clinical process with particular attention on client behavior; and the number of commitments made was a function of written accountability and order of conditions.

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