Improving the Social-Conversational Skills of Developmentally Delayed Children An Intervention Study Reports
Reports  |   May 01, 1988
Improving the Social-Conversational Skills of Developmentally Delayed Children
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   May 01, 1988
Improving the Social-Conversational Skills of Developmentally Delayed Children
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1988, Vol. 53, 156-167. doi:10.1044/jshd.5302.156
History: Received April 13, 1987 , Accepted August 18, 1987
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1988, Vol. 53, 156-167. doi:10.1044/jshd.5302.156
History: Received April 13, 1987; Accepted August 18, 1987

Twenty mothers and their preschool-aged, developmentally delayed children participated in this parent-focused intervention study. Nine mother-child dyads received an ll-week training program that espoused a social-conversational approach, while 11 dyads served as controls. Pre- and posttest videotapes were transcribed and coded to yield measures of turn taking, as well as indexes of responsiveness, topic control, and uninvolvement. Following treatment, the mothers in the experimental group were more responsive to and less controlling of their children's behavior than the mothers in the comparison group. The children initiated more topics, were more responsive to their mother's preceding turns, and used more verbal turns and a more diverse vocabulary than the control group children. No differences in language development, as measured by a standardized test, were found. Individual maternal responses to intervention as well as implications for modifying parent training programs are discussed.

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