Specialized Cognitive Function and Reading Achievement in Hearing-Impaired Adolescents This study evaluated the performance of hearing-impaired adolescents on tests of specialized cognitive functioning and explored the linkage between cognitive profile and reading achievement. Other variables noted were mathematics achievement, speech production, etiology, and age of onset of hearing loss. Subjects were 62 severely-to-profoundly hearing-impaired students between 15 and 20 ... Reports
Reports  |   February 01, 1988
Specialized Cognitive Function and Reading Achievement in Hearing-Impaired Adolescents
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   February 01, 1988
Specialized Cognitive Function and Reading Achievement in Hearing-Impaired Adolescents
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1988, Vol. 53, 30-41. doi:10.1044/jshd.5301.30
History: Received November 24, 1986 , Accepted March 16, 1987
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1988, Vol. 53, 30-41. doi:10.1044/jshd.5301.30
History: Received November 24, 1986; Accepted March 16, 1987

This study evaluated the performance of hearing-impaired adolescents on tests of specialized cognitive functioning and explored the linkage between cognitive profile and reading achievement. Other variables noted were mathematics achievement, speech production, etiology, and age of onset of hearing loss. Subjects were 62 severely-to-profoundly hearing-impaired students between 15 and 20 years of age, 31 "high readers" and 31 "low readers." Results indicated that, for this sample, cognitive function was below average for the verbal and sequential skills associated with the left hemisphere but above average for the "visuospatial" skills associated with the right hemisphere. Reading performance proved to be highly correlated with cognitive profile, as did mathematics performance and, to a lesser extent, speech and age of onset. Ramifications for instruction are discussed—in particular, development of strategies for using the right hemispheric cognitive strengths, as identified in this sample, to help overcome the deficits in "verbosequential" processing and reading achievement traditionally associated with hearing-impaired students.

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