Communication Breakdowns in Normal and Language Learning-Disabled Children's Conversation and Narration The frequency and type of communication breakdowns occurring in the speech of 7 language learning-disabled children (LLD), aged 9:10–11:1 (years:months), were examined in two conditions, conversation and narration, and compared to a group of 7 normal peers matched for chronological age and 7 peers matched for mean length of communication ... Reports
Reports  |   February 01, 1988
Communication Breakdowns in Normal and Language Learning-Disabled Children's Conversation and Narration
 
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Reports   |   February 01, 1988
Communication Breakdowns in Normal and Language Learning-Disabled Children's Conversation and Narration
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1988, Vol. 53, 2-7. doi:10.1044/jshd.5301.02
History: Received July 25, 1986 , Accepted January 26, 1987
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1988, Vol. 53, 2-7. doi:10.1044/jshd.5301.02
History: Received July 25, 1986; Accepted January 26, 1987

The frequency and type of communication breakdowns occurring in the speech of 7 language learning-disabled children (LLD), aged 9:10–11:1 (years:months), were examined in two conditions, conversation and narration, and compared to a group of 7 normal peers matched for chronological age and 7 peers matched for mean length of communication unit in conversation. Types of communication breakdowns examined included stalls, repairs, and abandoned utterances. The LLD group incurred a significantly greater rate of communication breakdowns per communication unit in narration than conversation compared to control group differences. Mean length of communication unit was also significantly greater in narration than conversation for the LLD group compared to controls. For all groups, across both speech sample conditions, longer communication units contained more breakdowns than shorter ones. The groups did not differ in the types of breakdowns. Communication unit length and the nature of the narrative task may account for the increased dysfluencies in LLD children's speech.

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