The Potential of Language Tasks for Identifying Senile Dementia More than two million elderly Americans suffer from senile dementia, an age-related disease affecting memory, intellect, and communication. The purpose of this study was to explore the diagnostic efficacy of language tasks for identifying senile dementia. The performance of 35 dementia patients was compared to that of 28 normal senescents ... Reports
Reports  |   May 01, 1982
The Potential of Language Tasks for Identifying Senile Dementia
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   May 01, 1982
The Potential of Language Tasks for Identifying Senile Dementia
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1982, Vol. 47, 210-217. doi:10.1044/jshd.4702.210
History: Received February 27, 1980 , Accepted June 8, 1981
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1982, Vol. 47, 210-217. doi:10.1044/jshd.4702.210
History: Received February 27, 1980; Accepted June 8, 1981

More than two million elderly Americans suffer from senile dementia, an age-related disease affecting memory, intellect, and communication. The purpose of this study was to explore the diagnostic efficacy of language tasks for identifying senile dementia. The performance of 35 dementia patients was compared to that of 28 normal senescents on five language tasks and certain psychological measures reputed to be sensitive to the disease such as the Block Design and Similarities subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, the Mental Status Questionnaire (MSQ), and the Nonsense Syllable Learning Test. Language tasks presented were: Story-retelling, Naming, Sentence Disambiguation, Verbal Expression, and Sentence Correction. A discriminant analysis found the Sentence Correction Task, the MSQ, and the Verbal Expression Test to best discriminate patients with senile dementia from normal aged subjects. Semantic functions were found to be more vulnerable than phonologic and syntactic to the effects of progressive cortical atrophy.

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