Gesture Recognition in Patients with Aphasia This study focuses on the controversial issue of the integrity of gestural communication abilities in subjects with aphasia. To define the ability of subjects to interpret symbolic gestures, an Amer-Ind Recognition Test (ART) was developed which required no verbal response from the examiner or the subject. The relationships between impairment ... Reports
Reports  |   February 01, 1982
Gesture Recognition in Patients with Aphasia
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   February 01, 1982
Gesture Recognition in Patients with Aphasia
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1982, Vol. 47, 43-49. doi:10.1044/jshd.4701.43
History: Received December 10, 1979 , Accepted February 23, 1981
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1982, Vol. 47, 43-49. doi:10.1044/jshd.4701.43
History: Received December 10, 1979; Accepted February 23, 1981

This study focuses on the controversial issue of the integrity of gestural communication abilities in subjects with aphasia. To define the ability of subjects to interpret symbolic gestures, an Amer-Ind Recognition Test (ART) was developed which required no verbal response from the examiner or the subject. The relationships between impairment of Amer-Ind signal recognition and (a) severity of aphasia, (b) listening and talking abilities and (c) the type of response picture used were investigated. Whether subjects more often chose related foils than unrelated foils in a forced-choice format was also examined. Two training tests and the ART are described. Results from administration to 15 aphasic subjects indicated that: (a) all subjects performed equally well, regardless of their aphasia severity classification; (b) action picture recognition was related to listening ability; (c) action pictures were easier to identify than object pictures; and (d) on error responses, subjects overwhelmingly chose related over unrelated foils. The possibility that gestural abilities were relatively well preserved among the subjects tested, in the presence of a wide range of listening and talking deficits, is also discussed.

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