Language Training in Natural and Clinical Environments A persistent problem in programs designed to help children acquire language skills is how to promote generalization so that the child can use communication skills in the widest variety of appropriate situations. One solution is to embed the teaching in the natural environment and, perhaps, to use the parent as ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 1982
Language Training in Natural and Clinical Environments
 
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Article Information
Article   |   February 01, 1982
Language Training in Natural and Clinical Environments
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1982, Vol. 47, 2-6. doi:10.1044/jshd.4701.02
History: Received March 30, 1981 , Accepted June 18, 1981
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1982, Vol. 47, 2-6. doi:10.1044/jshd.4701.02
History: Received March 30, 1981; Accepted June 18, 1981

A persistent problem in programs designed to help children acquire language skills is how to promote generalization so that the child can use communication skills in the widest variety of appropriate situations. One solution is to embed the teaching in the natural environment and, perhaps, to use the parent as the teacher. For some families, however, this may not be a feasible arrangement, because of the nature of the child's problem, the characteristics of the environment, or some interaction. It may then be most appropriate to teach the child in a clinical or laboratory environment and to use a formal language training program. When such programs are implemented, there is often a problem in extending or generalizing the child's newly acquired skills. Careful consideration of the manner in which stimuli are presented, the kinds of responses that are required, and the way in which reinforcement is dispensed may help to solve the difficulty in moving from laboratory to natural settings.

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