Response of an Agrammatic Patient to a Syntax Stimulation Program for Aphasia A Syntax Stimulation Program (SSP) based on the findings of neurolinguistic studies of agrammatic aphasic patients was used to treat one patient with a three year history of severe agrammatism. The SSP is designed to elicit eight different sentence constructions at two levels of difficulty using a story completion technique. ... Reports
Reports  |   November 01, 1981
Response of an Agrammatic Patient to a Syntax Stimulation Program for Aphasia
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   November 01, 1981
Response of an Agrammatic Patient to a Syntax Stimulation Program for Aphasia
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1981, Vol. 46, 422-427. doi:10.1044/jshd.4604.422
History: Received June 26, 1980 , Accepted December 23, 1980
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1981, Vol. 46, 422-427. doi:10.1044/jshd.4604.422
History: Received June 26, 1980; Accepted December 23, 1980

A Syntax Stimulation Program (SSP) based on the findings of neurolinguistic studies of agrammatic aphasic patients was used to treat one patient with a three year history of severe agrammatism. The SSP is designed to elicit eight different sentence constructions at two levels of difficulty using a story completion technique. The patient received pre-, mid- and post-treatment testing with the Northwestern Syntax Screening Test (NSST) and the cookie theft picture description of the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE). With 10 1/2 weeks of treatment, the patient's NSST expressive scores improved from 0 to 21, and his BDAE picture description showed increased phrase length and use of grammatical constructions. In addition, with this special treatment, the patient was able to produce grammatical speech in spontaneous conversation. Thus, the SSP appears to have therapeutic merit in training syntactic skills in presumably stable agrammatic patients.

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