Perception of Iconicity in American Sign Language by Hearing and Deaf Subjects Three groups of subjects differing in age, language experience, and familiarity with American Sign Language were compared on three tasks regarding the perception of iconicity in signs from American Sign Language. Subjects were asked to guess the meaning of signs, to rate signs for iconicity, and to state connections between ... Reports
Reports  |   November 01, 1981
Perception of Iconicity in American Sign Language by Hearing and Deaf Subjects
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Reports   |   November 01, 1981
Perception of Iconicity in American Sign Language by Hearing and Deaf Subjects
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1981, Vol. 46, 388-397. doi:10.1044/jshd.4604.388
History: Received July 31, 1980 , Accepted December 23, 1980
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1981, Vol. 46, 388-397. doi:10.1044/jshd.4604.388
History: Received July 31, 1980; Accepted December 23, 1980

Three groups of subjects differing in age, language experience, and familiarity with American Sign Language were compared on three tasks regarding the perception of iconicity in signs from American Sign Language. Subjects were asked to guess the meaning of signs, to rate signs for iconicity, and to state connections between signs and their meaning in English. Results showed that hearing college students, deaf adults, and hearing first-grade children perform similarly on tasks regarding iconicity. Results suggest a psycholinguistic definition of iconicity based on association values, rather than physical resemblances between signs and real-world referents.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access