Latency of Vocalization Onset for Stutterers and Nonstutterers under Conditions of Auditory and Visual, Cueing The purpose of this study was to determine whether stutterers and nonstutterers differed in latency of vocalization onset as a function of auditory and visual stimulus presentations. Twelve adult stutterers and 12 adult nonstutterers were compared for phonation onset latency under conditions of visual, right ear auditory, and left ear ... Reports
Reports  |   August 01, 1981
Latency of Vocalization Onset for Stutterers and Nonstutterers under Conditions of Auditory and Visual, Cueing
 
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Reports   |   August 01, 1981
Latency of Vocalization Onset for Stutterers and Nonstutterers under Conditions of Auditory and Visual, Cueing
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1981, Vol. 46, 307-312. doi:10.1044/jshd.4603.307
History: Received January 13, 1978 , Accepted May 30, 1980
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1981, Vol. 46, 307-312. doi:10.1044/jshd.4603.307
History: Received January 13, 1978; Accepted May 30, 1980

The purpose of this study was to determine whether stutterers and nonstutterers differed in latency of vocalization onset as a function of auditory and visual stimulus presentations. Twelve adult stutterers and 12 adult nonstutterers were compared for phonation onset latency under conditions of visual, right ear auditory, and left ear auditory cueing. Analyses of the data indicated that (a) overall phonation onset time did not differ significantly between the groups, (b) no significant differences were found for phonation onset time under conditions of combined auditory cueing, (c) stutterers were significantly slower for /pℵ/ when auditory cueing was presented to either the left ear, (d) stutterers were significantly slower for /pℵ/ and /bℵ/ when the values were combined for the left ear, and (e) there were no significant differences between stutterers' and nonstutterers' phonation onset times under visual cueing. The results are interpreted to implicate a possible role of auditory system functioning in stutterers' motor control for speech tasks such as phonation onset.

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