A Minimal-Word-Pair Model for Teaching the Linguistic Significance of Distinctive Feature Properties A word level behavioral routine for the remediation of distinctive feature errors was developed for resolving some current theoretical criticisms of minimal-pair therapy. Seven children with moderate to severe non-organic phonological disabilities were taught to correctly discriminate and produce sounds in words by utilizing lexical contrasts. A one-group pretest-posttest design ... Reports
Reports  |   August 01, 1981
A Minimal-Word-Pair Model for Teaching the Linguistic Significance of Distinctive Feature Properties
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   August 01, 1981
A Minimal-Word-Pair Model for Teaching the Linguistic Significance of Distinctive Feature Properties
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1981, Vol. 46, 291-296. doi:10.1044/jshd.4603.291
History: Received December 22, 1977 , Accepted August 12, 1980
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1981, Vol. 46, 291-296. doi:10.1044/jshd.4603.291
History: Received December 22, 1977; Accepted August 12, 1980

A word level behavioral routine for the remediation of distinctive feature errors was developed for resolving some current theoretical criticisms of minimal-pair therapy. Seven children with moderate to severe non-organic phonological disabilities were taught to correctly discriminate and produce sounds in words by utilizing lexical contrasts. A one-group pretest-posttest design was utilized to establish that the number and severity of the sound substitutions decreased with training. Phonemic improvement was demonstrated with as few as three minimal-pair-words. A paradigm is proffered for future development and explanation.

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