Systematic Sound Preference as a Characteristic of Phonological Disability Systematic sound preference was described as a common phonological process seen in young children with unintelligible speech. In its classic form, sound preference occurred when an entire class of sounds was replaced by one sound. Sound preference most commonly occurred in the word-initial position and affected fricatives more frequently than ... Reports
Reports  |   August 01, 1981
Systematic Sound Preference as a Characteristic of Phonological Disability
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   August 01, 1981
Systematic Sound Preference as a Characteristic of Phonological Disability
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1981, Vol. 46, 281-286. doi:10.1044/jshd.4603.281
History: Received May 16, 1979 , Accepted May 27, 1980
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1981, Vol. 46, 281-286. doi:10.1044/jshd.4603.281
History: Received May 16, 1979; Accepted May 27, 1980

Systematic sound preference was described as a common phonological process seen in young children with unintelligible speech. In its classic form, sound preference occurred when an entire class of sounds was replaced by one sound. Sound preference most commonly occurred in the word-initial position and affected fricatives more frequently than any other manner category. In cases where sound preference did not affect all members of a manner of production, it affected the voiceless and/or non-labial sounds.

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