Articulation Generalization of Voiced-Voiceless Sounds in Hearing-Impaired Children Eight hearing-impaired children participated in a study exploring the effect of training (+) or (-) voicing on generalization to cognates. In an experimental multiple baseline study across behaviors, children were trained on pairs of voiced and voiceless target sounds that they had previously omitted in final position. The pairs consisted ... Reports
Reports  |   November 01, 1986
Articulation Generalization of Voiced-Voiceless Sounds in Hearing-Impaired Children
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Reports   |   November 01, 1986
Articulation Generalization of Voiced-Voiceless Sounds in Hearing-Impaired Children
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1986, Vol. 51, 348-355. doi:10.1044/jshd.5104.348
History: Received February 21, 1986 , Accepted April 24, 1986
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1986, Vol. 51, 348-355. doi:10.1044/jshd.5104.348
History: Received February 21, 1986; Accepted April 24, 1986

Eight hearing-impaired children participated in a study exploring the effect of training (+) or (-) voicing on generalization to cognates. In an experimental multiple baseline study across behaviors, children were trained on pairs of voiced and voiceless target sounds that they had previously omitted in final position. The pairs consisted of the/t/and/g/and the/d/and/k/. When/t/ was trained, generalization was tested to (a) untrained words with the/t/in the final position and (b) untrained words containing /d/(the cognate) of the/t/. In like manner, when/d/was trained, generalization was tested to both the/d/and/t/words. The/g/and /k/ received identical treatment. A contrast procedure was used to teach the children to produce the final consonants. When training criterion was reached, generalization was tested. Results showed that 6 of the 8 children generalized both the voiced and unvoiced target sounds to 50% or more of the target sound probe items. Results also indicated that more generalization occurred to the voiceless cognate from voiced target sound training than occurred to voiced cognates from voiceless target sound training.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access