Language-Impaired 4-Year-Olds Distinguishing Transient from Persistent Impairment Reports
Reports  |   May 01, 1987
Language-Impaired 4-Year-Olds
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   May 01, 1987
Language-Impaired 4-Year-Olds
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1987, Vol. 52, 156-173. doi:10.1044/jshd.5202.156
History: Received March 28, 1986 , Accepted August 29, 1986
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1987, Vol. 52, 156-173. doi:10.1044/jshd.5202.156
History: Received March 28, 1986; Accepted August 29, 1986

In a prospective, longitudinal study, 87 language-impaired children were assessed at the ages of 4, 4½, and 5½ years on a battery of language measures. In 37% of children, who were termed the "good outcome group," the language disorder had resolved by the age of 5½ years so that children were indistinguishable from a control group. If one restricted consideration only to those 68 children whose nonverbal ability was within normal limits, the figure rose to 44%. Outcome for individual children (good or poor) could be predicted with 90% accuracy on the basis of test measures obtained at 4 years. The best predictor was ability to tell back a simple story to pictures. The one language measure that did not relate to outcome was phonological competence.

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