Learning Words Using Traditional Orthography and the Symbols of Rebus, Bliss, and Carrier This study compared the learning of words represented in traditional orthography (T.O.) and in the logographic symbols of Rebus, Bliss, and Carrier. Subjects, 36 preschool children ages 4.3 to 5.4, were presented a short task requiring the learning of 15 words in one of the four graphic conditions, Rebus, Carrier, ... Reports
Reports  |   May 01, 1981
Learning Words Using Traditional Orthography and the Symbols of Rebus, Bliss, and Carrier
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   May 01, 1981
Learning Words Using Traditional Orthography and the Symbols of Rebus, Bliss, and Carrier
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1981, Vol. 46, 191-196. doi:10.1044/jshd.4602.191
History: Received February 8, 1979 , Accepted July 7, 1980
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1981, Vol. 46, 191-196. doi:10.1044/jshd.4602.191
History: Received February 8, 1979; Accepted July 7, 1980

This study compared the learning of words represented in traditional orthography (T.O.) and in the logographic symbols of Rebus, Bliss, and Carrier. Subjects, 36 preschool children ages 4.3 to 5.4, were presented a short task requiring the learning of 15 words in one of the four graphic conditions, Rebus, Carrier, or T.O. The results showed that the logographic symbols as a group were significantly easier to learn than T.O., the partially iconic systems of Rebus and Bliss were significantly easier to learn than the Carrier symbols, and Rebus symbols were significantly easier to learn than Bliss symbols. Implications for the instructional use of logographic systems are discussed.

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