Reports  |   May 1981
The Role of Distinctive Features in Articulation Errors
 
Author Notes
  • © 1981 by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Reports   |   May 1981
The Role of Distinctive Features in Articulation Errors
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1981, Vol. 46, 174-183. doi:10.1044/jshd.4602.174
History: Received April 18, 1979 , Accepted August 19, 1980
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1981, Vol. 46, 174-183. doi:10.1044/jshd.4602.174
History: Received April 18, 1979; Accepted August 19, 1980

Articulation errors of 1,077 children of various ages, etiologies, and sexes were taken from several standardized articulation tests. The Singh and Singh (1976) distinctive feature system was used to produce profiles for each subgroup for consonant phonemes in the initial, medial, and final word positions. Distinctive features were used with different degrees of importance causing hierarchial orders among the features. The hierarchy of features established in this study was consistent with those found in previous studies. It was more pronounced for the initial position than for the medial and final positions, and for the younger age groups as compared with the older groups. In addition, the feature hierarchy for the articulation-disordered group was more distinct than that for the language group. Females revealed a generally superior performance to males, but this superiority was in general not statistically significant. Findings are discussed as to their relevance in the overall application of a phonological theory to speech production strategies.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access