Performance of Children with Normal and Impaired Oral Language Production on a Set of Auditory Comprehension Tests The purpose of this study was to investigate the comprehension abilities of children with impaired expressive language and to obtain information on the interrelationships among tests of comprehension. Forty preschool children, 20 with normal language and 20 with impaired expressive language, were given a set of auditory comprehension tests. As ... Reports
Reports  |   May 01, 1981
Performance of Children with Normal and Impaired Oral Language Production on a Set of Auditory Comprehension Tests
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   May 01, 1981
Performance of Children with Normal and Impaired Oral Language Production on a Set of Auditory Comprehension Tests
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1981, Vol. 46, 150-159. doi:10.1044/jshd.4602.150
History: Received June 28, 1977 , Accepted March 28, 1980
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1981, Vol. 46, 150-159. doi:10.1044/jshd.4602.150
History: Received June 28, 1977; Accepted March 28, 1980

The purpose of this study was to investigate the comprehension abilities of children with impaired expressive language and to obtain information on the interrelationships among tests of comprehension. Forty preschool children, 20 with normal language and 20 with impaired expressive language, were given a set of auditory comprehension tests. As a group, the language-impaired children demonstrated deficits in comprehension when compared to the normal-language children. However, both groups scored near the ceiling on several tests, and on most tests that did differentiate the two groups, the mean scores of both groups were above the norms. Standardization samples in a number of these tests may make corresponding norms of limited value when applied to performances of middle-class white children. An analysis of responses to selected groupings of analogous items revealed that a preschool child's correct response to a linguistic stimulus in one instance provides no assurance that the child will respond similarly to the stimulus in another linguistic environment with different task demands and different foil alternatives, In addition, the large majority of correlations among the tests were nonsignificant, indicating that it is not clinically appropriate to regard these measures of language comprehension as equivalent.

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