Noncommunicative Functions of Language in Children The noncommunicative functions of language include the concept-formation function, the directive function, the magical function, and the function of establishing the self-image. These functions account for language that is not directed to a listener or does not communicate meaning or feeling. While current accounts of child language stress the communicative ... Forum
Forum  |   February 01, 1973
Noncommunicative Functions of Language in Children
 
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Forum   |   February 01, 1973
Noncommunicative Functions of Language in Children
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1973, Vol. 38, 98-110. doi:10.1044/jshd.3801.98
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1973, Vol. 38, 98-110. doi:10.1044/jshd.3801.98

The noncommunicative functions of language include the concept-formation function, the directive function, the magical function, and the function of establishing the self-image. These functions account for language that is not directed to a listener or does not communicate meaning or feeling. While current accounts of child language stress the communicative function, a review of sources in anthropology, philosophy, and child development reveals many examples of language serving noncommunicative functions. It is suggested that the child’s motivations for learning language include these noncommunicative functions as well as the traditional function of communicating meanings and feelings. Some implications of the noncommunicative functions of language for the study and treatment of children with language disorders are mentioned.

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