A Lexical Approach to the Remediation of Final Sound Omissions The hypothesis presented and the training method arising from that hypothesis suggest that a language training (vocabulary building) or lexical approach to the remediation of final sound omissions may for some children be an effective method of therapy. A six-year-old trainable mentally retarded boy with a vocabulary of five understandable ... Case Reports
Case Reports  |   February 01, 1973
A Lexical Approach to the Remediation of Final Sound Omissions
 
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Article Information
Case Reports   |   February 01, 1973
A Lexical Approach to the Remediation of Final Sound Omissions
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1973, Vol. 38, 126-130. doi:10.1044/jshd.3801.126
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1973, Vol. 38, 126-130. doi:10.1044/jshd.3801.126

The hypothesis presented and the training method arising from that hypothesis suggest that a language training (vocabulary building) or lexical approach to the remediation of final sound omissions may for some children be an effective method of therapy. A six-year-old trainable mentally retarded boy with a vocabulary of five understandable words, all of which contained final consonant omissions, was taught by a lexical method. He was required to use the final consonant to differentiate between word alternatives not previously present in his vocabulary. This method of training brought obvious improvement in the use of final consonants, and should offer an alternative to the traditional approach to therapy for some children who omit final consonant sounds.

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