Evaluation of Special Hearing Aids for Deaf Children Two types of special hearing aid have been developed recently to improve the reception of speech by profoundly deaf children. In a different way, each special system provides greater low-frequency acoustic stimulation to deaf ears than does a conventional hearing aid. One of the devices extends the low-frequency limit of ... Forum
Forum  |   November 01, 1971
Evaluation of Special Hearing Aids for Deaf Children
 
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Forum   |   November 01, 1971
Evaluation of Special Hearing Aids for Deaf Children
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1971, Vol. 36, 527-537. doi:10.1044/jshd.3604.527
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1971, Vol. 36, 527-537. doi:10.1044/jshd.3604.527

Two types of special hearing aid have been developed recently to improve the reception of speech by profoundly deaf children. In a different way, each special system provides greater low-frequency acoustic stimulation to deaf ears than does a conventional hearing aid. One of the devices extends the low-frequency limit of amplification; the other shifts high-frequency energy to a lower frequency range. In general, previous evaluations of these special hearing aids have obtained inconsistent or inconclusive results. This paper reviews most of the published research on the use of special hearing aids by deaf children, summarizes several unpublished studies, and suggests a set of guidelines for future evaluations of special and conventional amplification systems.

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