A Preliminary View of Information Theory and Articulatory Omissions This paper presents a preliminary view of the clinical application of information theory. An analysis of a six-year-old child demonstrating inconsistent omissions of /z/ revealed that the /z/ items the child uttered were associated with much information while the /z/ items the child omitted contributed little information. Rather than sequencing ... Forum
Forum  |   November 01, 1971
A Preliminary View of Information Theory and Articulatory Omissions
 
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Forum   |   November 01, 1971
A Preliminary View of Information Theory and Articulatory Omissions
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1971, Vol. 36, 511-517. doi:10.1044/jshd.3604.511
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1971, Vol. 36, 511-517. doi:10.1044/jshd.3604.511

This paper presents a preliminary view of the clinical application of information theory. An analysis of a six-year-old child demonstrating inconsistent omissions of /z/ revealed that the /z/ items the child uttered were associated with much information while the /z/ items the child omitted contributed little information. Rather than sequencing treatment from those tasks most easily performed by the child to more difficult tasks, this approach commenced by requiring the child to correctly utter sentences more difficult for a listener to comprehend, and proceeded to requiring him to correctly utter sentences much easier for the listener to comprehend. This approach was based on the assumption that it is the listeners in a child’s environment who are, at least in part, responsible for the child’s articulatory behavior.

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