On Normal and Autistic Pronouns Ego-based explanations for the autistic child’s characteristic patterns of pronominal reversals and avoidances have failed to recognize the problems faced by all children when confronted with personal pronouns. Traditional approaches rest almost entirely on inferences about presumed failure in self-resolution while ignoring the linguistic hurdles posed by shifting denotations and ... Forum
Forum  |   May 01, 1971
On Normal and Autistic Pronouns
 
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Forum   |   May 01, 1971
On Normal and Autistic Pronouns
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1971, Vol. 36, 242-249. doi:10.1044/jshd.3602.242
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1971, Vol. 36, 242-249. doi:10.1044/jshd.3602.242

Ego-based explanations for the autistic child’s characteristic patterns of pronominal reversals and avoidances have failed to recognize the problems faced by all children when confronted with personal pronouns. Traditional approaches rest almost entirely on inferences about presumed failure in self-resolution while ignoring the linguistic hurdles posed by shifting denotations and by the overlapping of code and message. An alternative approach, based on studies of echolalia, considers grammatical aspects of acquisition, reversal, and nonreversal. The research and treatment focus is consequently shifted from the primacy of expressive I to the comprehension of the you/me dichotomy.

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