Speech Development In The Young Child: 1. The Autism Theory Of Speech Development And Some Clinical Applications Articles
Articles  |   September 01, 1952
Speech Development In The Young Child: 1. The Autism Theory Of Speech Development And Some Clinical Applications
 
Author Notes
  • * At the 1951 Annual Convention of ASHA at Chicago, Ill., a symposium under this title was arranged by George J. Wischner, who served as Chairman. The Journal here presents as a group the three provocative papers comprising this program.
    At the 1951 Annual Convention of ASHA at Chicago, Ill., a symposium under this title was arranged by George J. Wischner, who served as Chairman. The Journal here presents as a group the three provocative papers comprising this program.×
    In introducing the symposium, Chairman Wischner made substantially the following remarks: ‘Just a few of the highly significant questions to be raised and treated explicitly or implicitly in this symposium are: To what data do we refer when we say, “teach sounds in developmental order?” How early should speech therapy be given? What is meant by language maturity? What are the interrelationships among the various dimensions of speech and language behavior? How adequate are available norms of speech development? What is the relationship between speech sound development in the infant and the various aspects of later speech behavior? What are the mechanisms whereby the seemingly chaotic, meaningless prelinguistic utterances of the infant develop into the meaningful words, phrases and sentences of early childhood? Is imitation an adequate concept for understanding and explaining how the child learns to talk? What do talking birds have to do with talking children? How may learning theory contribute to our understanding of the development of language? Is the speech behavior of the infant the random, haphazard foundation upon which later orderly speech processes are built or does the infant’s behavior, too, show regularity in the sense of scientific lawfulness?
    In introducing the symposium, Chairman Wischner made substantially the following remarks: ‘Just a few of the highly significant questions to be raised and treated explicitly or implicitly in this symposium are: To what data do we refer when we say, “teach sounds in developmental order?” How early should speech therapy be given? What is meant by language maturity? What are the interrelationships among the various dimensions of speech and language behavior? How adequate are available norms of speech development? What is the relationship between speech sound development in the infant and the various aspects of later speech behavior? What are the mechanisms whereby the seemingly chaotic, meaningless prelinguistic utterances of the infant develop into the meaningful words, phrases and sentences of early childhood? Is imitation an adequate concept for understanding and explaining how the child learns to talk? What do talking birds have to do with talking children? How may learning theory contribute to our understanding of the development of language? Is the speech behavior of the infant the random, haphazard foundation upon which later orderly speech processes are built or does the infant’s behavior, too, show regularity in the sense of scientific lawfulness?×
  • O. H. Mowrer (Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1932) is Research Professor of Psychology, University of Illinois. A fuller elaboration and documentation of the ideas here expressed is given in Mowrer (4).
    O. H. Mowrer (Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1932) is Research Professor of Psychology, University of Illinois. A fuller elaboration and documentation of the ideas here expressed is given in Mowrer (4).×
Article Information
Articles   |   September 01, 1952
Speech Development In The Young Child: 1. The Autism Theory Of Speech Development And Some Clinical Applications
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, September 1952, Vol. 17, 263-268. doi:10.1044/jshd.1703.263
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, September 1952, Vol. 17, 263-268. doi:10.1044/jshd.1703.263
This content is PDF only. Please click on the PDF icon to access.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access