Information Theory: 1. Information Theory to 1951—A Non-Technical Review Articles
Articles  |   June 01, 1952
Information Theory: 1. Information Theory to 1951—A Non-Technical Review
 
Author Notes
  • * The three distinguished papers here published as a group were originally presented at the 1951 Annual Convention of ASHA, Chicago, Ill., in a joint meeting with SAA under the chairmanship of James F. Curtis. In reproducing them substantially in their original oral form, the Journal deviates from its usual policy.
    The three distinguished papers here published as a group were originally presented at the 1951 Annual Convention of ASHA, Chicago, Ill., in a joint meeting with SAA under the chairmanship of James F. Curtis. In reproducing them substantially in their original oral form, the Journal deviates from its usual policy.×
  • The writer was asked to make a talk on information theory to an audience interested in speech problems. Assuming that most persons in the audience were unacquainted with the theory, and that they would not relish mathematical details, it seemed desirable not to be too severe as regards technical accuracy, to abandon any pretense of an orderly development of the subject, and to present a few main features which would indicate the general nature of the theory. This in turn, led to an informal mode of oral presentation, which was made without any manuscript.
    The writer was asked to make a talk on information theory to an audience interested in speech problems. Assuming that most persons in the audience were unacquainted with the theory, and that they would not relish mathematical details, it seemed desirable not to be too severe as regards technical accuracy, to abandon any pretense of an orderly development of the subject, and to present a few main features which would indicate the general nature of the theory. This in turn, led to an informal mode of oral presentation, which was made without any manuscript.×
    Having been asked to write out what I said, I either have to stick to the same informal style, or I must substantially alter both the contents and the presentation. I have done the former, even though this sort of exposition is not very usual in print. As nearly as I can remember, this is what I said—although it is true that I have experienced esprit d’escalier, and at a few points this is not exactly what I said, but what I now wish that I had said.
    Having been asked to write out what I said, I either have to stick to the same informal style, or I must substantially alter both the contents and the presentation. I have done the former, even though this sort of exposition is not very usual in print. As nearly as I can remember, this is what I said—although it is true that I have experienced esprit d’escalier, and at a few points this is not exactly what I said, but what I now wish that I had said.×
  • Warren Weaver (Ph.D., Wisconsin, 1921) is Director of the Division of Natural Sciences and Agriculture, Rockefeller Foundation.
    Warren Weaver (Ph.D., Wisconsin, 1921) is Director of the Division of Natural Sciences and Agriculture, Rockefeller Foundation.×
Article Information
Articles   |   June 01, 1952
Information Theory: 1. Information Theory to 1951—A Non-Technical Review
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, June 1952, Vol. 17, 166-174. doi:10.1044/jshd.1702.166
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, June 1952, Vol. 17, 166-174. doi:10.1044/jshd.1702.166
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